Browsed by
Category: Internet

Five for Frid-ing

Five for Frid-ing

I was always a fan of the Friday 5 meme, so here’s a past-blast redux, why not.

1) Austin Kleon gave a wonderful talk at the Bond conference last week, on maintaining your creative momentum and such.

2) Since the beginning of hockey season, I’ve been trying to be less a fan of any particular team and enjoy the game and the players I admire more. Still, there’s beauty in the way fandom wears its collective heart on its sleeve, and if you’re outside it you don’t feel the same impact. And since my former fanning was done in support of the Vancouver Canucks, I couldn’t help but be caught up in the last home game the fabled Sedin twins will ever play. Not only was it touching to see such affection pouring from the fans and other players (on both teams), it was also a thrilling nail-biter of a finish in overtime. It embodied the best of what pro sports can offer.

3) The complete visual timeline of the Paramount Pictures logo

4) This hilarious flaming hot take about how bands should keep their sets to 20 minutes long. It’s as amusing for its no-fucks-given style as for the outraged comments taking it very seriously.

5) The always charming Crimes Against Hugh’s Manatees comic strip

Future Friday lists will probably occur, this was fun.

What’s Important

What’s Important

Really, it’s “what’s important?”

The question is yours to answer, we’ll all have a different list, sometimes several things, sometimes one.

But as social feeds get better at gaming your very human instincts and desires, it’s ever more incumbent to decide how much time is too much to spend with them. To that end, writing down the one or three things you view as “important” could be a useful reminder to spend most of your free time on them, and not digital minutiae.

Title: “What’s Important?”

And then use that to focus your attention and daily habit.

Value Added

Value Added

Along the digital hygiene self-examination track I’ve roared into headlong, I made my way slowly through Dan Hon’s newsletter (worth subscribing to, if you’re interested in informed ruminations on tech and its intersection with human life) wherein he talks about the difficulty in discerning whether social media corps. are engineering quirks of our brain reward system to get us addicted to the feeds they dangle, or if it’s just a coincidence of their format.

Basically, I wondered, is it just easier to make a decision about what we value? Do we value our time to make things and—even the precious moments we rarely find to just sit and do nothing—more than the endless stream of discrete information that’s overloading us?

Sorry, leading question your honor, withdrawn.

As creators, makers, we probably want our work to be valued. But if we don’t carve out time for it—probably more than we think we need—it doesn’t receive the raw input that imbues much of that potential value. In my opinion.

The Feed takes value from us. It takes it in the form of our time, our focus, and our personal data. We’re attempting to put value back into the world. Perhaps we should consider if we need a lot more of our own raw value to be able to do that.

Discovery and Inspiration

Discovery and Inspiration

Today was one of amazing things discovered and more work than I’d planned on coding lessons. Here are some things I was amazed by:

Marcus Aurelius’s classic Meditations. I’ve read bits of it, always surprised by its continued relevancy, but here’s an e-version.

Oprah Winfrey’s impassioned Golden Globes acceptance speech about womens’ empowerment and change.

If Smashing Pumpkins were Silversun Pickups, they’d be Big Jesus.

Images constructed to refocus machine-learned AI attention away from the thing they’re trying to recognize (a bit obscure phrase, I know, but the story explains).

Art comes from the stuff we take in: all nature, human interaction, and the creations of others.

Some of the Links I Checked Out in the Week of Mar. 26

Some of the Links I Checked Out in the Week of Mar. 26

In chronological order. I was going to sort them by type or category, but this is kind of interesting, and waaay easier. It’s also probably too long, though it’s a fraction of my history. If I do this again, more brutal editing might be a thing. If you want some kind of insight into my outrageously scattered searching, it might be here. But who knows?

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

 Saturday