Good Ol’ Nick, Ol’ Pal, Ol’ Buddy, Getting Things Done

Good Ol’ Nick, Ol’ Pal, Ol’ Buddy, Getting Things Done

Many of us have a tendency to shorten names of things. Nicknames are a staple trope of parody, from Rich, the office nicknamer on Saturday Night Live in the 90s (played by Rob Schneider) to any number of frat boy stereotypes on YouTube—usually prefixing the word, “bro”.

This can be affectionate or belittling. People have various reactions, I think, and I wouldn’t begrudge anyone their feelings when hit by one. What I would hesitate to validate is a tendency to shorten up the work you do. I watched other artists do it in school, and I see some of them doing the same now.

We’re under tremendous pressure as a society—Americans, specifically, but it crosses boundaries—to be continually more productive. We’re encouraged to get more done, quicker, in higher volume. I think we should avoid subjecting our art to that pressure.

Time is precious, but time is something art can luxuriate in. It takes as long as it takes. To be sure, we need to keep up the habit, keep going, strive for flow every day. But rushing is out. Productivity is out. As long as you’re showing up to make the thing, it should take as long as it needs to take, without pushing it into being. Take the weight off yourself, your work will unfold as it’s ready.

Being Affected by Things Until You Can’t Even

Being Affected by Things Until You Can’t Even

It happens. I say be destroyed by stories, shows, albums, interpretive dances. All that stuff that makes you feel so vulnerable is a piece of your being now, and you need that depth of feeling if you’re going to make sincere work.

Game of Thrones and/or new Mountain Goats album it up.

The Lyrical Lifestyle Is an Interpretive One

The Lyrical Lifestyle Is an Interpretive One

I’m not one to go quoting rock lyrics—oh, all right, yes I am. Mostly I do to myself, but if some unsuspecting cow-orker or friend accidentally quotes a piece of a song I know or something close to it, I’ll jump in there and finish a line. Usually I’m just the weirdo being weird, and I have to explain what I’m talking about.

I thought a long time ago that it was easily as valid a choice to apply some lyricist’s rhymes to my life as any random philosopher. And I still do, mostly. Snippets of philosophy rarely do justice to the thoughts behind them pulled out of context. We apply phrases and lines to events and situations to graft our own extemporaneous meaning onto those things, anyway. So what does it matter the context of the original?

Art making is sometimes similar. Our influences and favorites sneak into our work all the time. Usually it’s not wholesale, but just a hint of the thing it came from. It’s a method of brushstroke. It’s a melodic quirk. It’s a metaphor stretched in a peculiar, but compelling, way.

Little pieces of out-of-context art from fellow artists, like lyric snippets, have stuck in our souls. When they emerge, it’s because they’ve become part of us, and therefore shape our own work. Embrace that weirdness, because it all makes you, you.

After a Long Bout of Sun, the Rain Will Come Again

After a Long Bout of Sun, the Rain Will Come Again

The opposite of what’s commonly thought of as “good weather” can be the sought after and enjoyable type to some. Specifically, to me.

Today was rainy for the first time in a couple of weeks. For me, growing up in the deserts of Arizona and California, rain is like a strange and beautiful prize. I can’t get enough, or at least I don’t know what my limit is. If this love of cloudy days and speckled windshields defies expectations, good.

We all—me included—need our assumptions challenged regularly.

A Steady Drip of Ideas and Disorientation on the Edge of Sleep

A Steady Drip of Ideas and Disorientation on the Edge of Sleep

You can get plenty of weird ideas while you’re falling asleep. And weird ideas—or unexpected, if you like—are what you want if you’re an artist. But execution is missing. You’re tired, drifting. It’s nearly impossible to bring an idea to reason, never mind fleshing it out.

But ideas are valuable just to keep handy. They’re easy, fruitful, and full of possibility. That’s all they need to be on their own.

The Best Answer About Life and What Comes After From a Thoughtful Human Being

The Best Answer About Life and What Comes After From a Thoughtful Human Being

I spend considerable time every Mother’s Day missing mine. It is getting a little easier balancing that with remembering how lucky I was that she was so amazing.

But I couldn’t help sharing this small, profound moment from Keanu Reeves’s appearance on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert. It’s just a person who’s aware of our place in the universe and he tells the truth.

“What do you think happens when we die, Keanu Reeves?”

“… I know that the ones who love us will miss us.”

Throwing Stuff at the Virtual Wall to See What Virtually Sticks

Throwing Stuff at the Virtual Wall to See What Virtually Sticks

There’s always a shift when I start searching for something new to make, but most of the time, it comes back to observational drawing & painting. It’s a comfortable place to get some interpretive ideas happening and also keep skills in a semblance of shape.

It’s one of our oldest art traditions, and therefore a bit primal. Drawing or painting the things you see links a kinship to those earliest artists drawing bison and horses in the dark.

There’s a focus and feeling of connection that nothing else can boast. Even though first sketches are often crude, pieces of them have power.

The Beautiful Geology of Karin Waskiewicz’s Paintings

The Beautiful Geology of Karin Waskiewicz’s Paintings

© Karin Waskiewicz

I can’t believe I haven’t shared Karin Waskiewicz here before, but a search of the archives seems to show just that. I came across her work when I was finishing my BFA, and it’s engrossing and beautiful. At the time I bookmarked and clipped several of her online images, I was struck by her simple, careful, and novel approach. I’m also a sucker for saturated color, and there’s lots to be found.

At the time, she worked mainly by layering dozens of paint layers on panel, building them up as they dried. She then used tools to carve back into the painting’s stratigraphy, creating biomorphic forms and patterns. She’s got some new work at her site that’s more atmospheric and subtle, but the heart of it is the same. Mesmerizing work that rewards long viewings, is what it is. Her Instagram is here.

Shifting the Change Is the Best Way to Really Mess With Your Sleep Cycle

Shifting the Change Is the Best Way to Really Mess With Your Sleep Cycle

I’m in a period where I’m not always sure what I meant when I write these titles.

But, basically, I’ve had a tighter than normal schedule and it upended me mentally. The nice thing is that when this happens, I know how to return to what passes for “normal” when it changes back.