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Month: January 2019

Embrace the Fog of War

Embrace the Fog of War

In 4x and several top-down view games, in general, you can only see the area you’ve explored around you. It gets wider and more complete the more you move around, building and searching.

Art’s like that. You start with the barest notion of what you’re going to end up with. You’re creating a new world with a new map, and it can be a little scary and not a little confusing.

But just as we trust in the game designers to allow few if any dead ends and disconnected areas, we trust our selves to uncover the patterns and the countryside of the piece we’re working on.

We discover the map in the process of creating, and if we open up to the discovery, it’s an exciting journey. An exciting game.

When the Book Gets Boring, Slow Down a Little

When the Book Gets Boring, Slow Down a Little

Unless it’s been boring for a good while, then it’s probably time to dump it for something else. But I found I tend to start skimming when I’m not really focused on reading a book.

One thing that helps me fall back into a narrative or idea structure is to consciously slow down, wringing nuance and understanding from each word until I forget everything but what I’m reading. This helps re-focus, and if you’re not getting lost, metaphorically, you’re Somewhere Else.

Now apply the same principle to your work. Slow down. See if that lets you re-focus and lose yourself.

The Lost Mystical Art of Understanding Your Work

The Lost Mystical Art of Understanding Your Work

Psych! There is no such secret knowledge. I’m almost inclined to make this about your day job, but I won’t. That’s maybe a little too “wink-wink,” and you don’t need that.

Most of us who make art really have no idea what it means, or what we’re doing. I mean, we have skills, a practice, routines, starting points, and something to say. But if asked, we usually only have some vague things to say that could as easily go on the description on the wall placard.

To risk yet another contradictory headline, it doesn’t matter as much that you understand what you make. Other people will derive their own meaning no matter what you do, but being really specific would only partly prevent that. It’s great if it’s widely, wildly interpretable by many people, but that still misses the larger point.

You make the art for your own reasons, and you don’t always know what they are. And that’s cool.

The Time Dilation Effect on a Rainy Day

The Time Dilation Effect on a Rainy Day

Today was a strange day. It seemed to stretch on for hours longer than it’s allotted time, when no matter what I did, there was still more time before work.

But it was nice, and reminded me of the sensation you get when you lose yourself in the flow of art making. Time just seems to open up and you lose yourself in the work. More of those days, please.

When All Around Is Chaos, It’s Your Habit That Gives You the Anchor

When All Around Is Chaos, It’s Your Habit That Gives You the Anchor

That and staying mostly off social media. The never-ending feed of friends, family, enemies, and annoying friends-of-enemies can throw you off balance and out of whack, emotionally and mentally.

But you always have your thing, remember. You can always return to your center, your place of zen. The creative well is always available, whether we think it’s bringing up anything good or not. We’re not always the best judge of what’s good in the moment. If you keep at it, there will be good stuff you can build on and savor.

I’ve found it a bit pat when people say things like, “get to work!” But it’s just the simplest way to say all the foregoing. Keep a creative habit, do your thing, and the work will be good enough, often enough, to keep moving forward and—in the most renewable ways—detoxify you.

Rediscovering Discoveries I Thought I Wasn’t Into Subverts My Assumptions

Rediscovering Discoveries I Thought I Wasn’t Into Subverts My Assumptions

Assumptions about what I like can quickly become dogma, and it’s especially strong where music is concerned. Like any other preference in art, it’s good to push against your biases and preconceptions, even when you’re the one who made them.

Parquet Courts is a recent example. I like them, but wasn’t as blown away by their last album as a lot of people in my musical sphere of influence. And yet, somehow, this one song played while I was out today, and I didn’t remember they’d done it. It was terrific, different than most of the other songs, and made me want to listen more closely to the whole album.

There. Opinion diverted, openness to explore renewed. I hope I can keep that mindset going in the future.

“Wide Awake” on Spotify

The Secret Is, It’s All About X

The Secret Is, It’s All About X

But seriously, though, it’s never just about one thing. Your quest to be genuine, authentic, sincere. Your drive to be great at your thing. Your desire to connect with people.

Life and business and creativity all have multiple paths and more than one reason things go either wrong or right.

A Little Push Against Your Comfort Zone Is Good, and Helps Any Expansive Goal

A Little Push Against Your Comfort Zone Is Good, and Helps Any Expansive Goal

If you want to get better at a thing—your thing, let’s say—you have to get out of any routine where you’re comfortable. It has to hurt a little, be annoying, a bit hard. The muscle metaphor is spread around a lot regarding this principle, by any number of experts in motivation or self-improvement: no pain, no gain.

But I’m not talking about being so sore you can hardly move. I just mean a small amount of discomfort. See, I don’t think you have to push your limits all the time. Steady progress can be had with the smallest nudge against your present abilities.

What matters is that you notice. That you recognize breaking out of easy routine, or you look ahead to where you’d like to be with your thing, your work. It can be discouraging to hurt a lot, even if you know the gains will come faster. I’m for whatever keeps moving you forward, and outside of the gym, it’s perfectly fine to go slow and get better in very small steps.

It’s still getting better.