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Author: Marcus

Defying One’s Musical Expectations for Fun and (Non-Monetary) Profit With Strange Genres

Defying One’s Musical Expectations for Fun and (Non-Monetary) Profit With Strange Genres

That’s what I was listening to earlier this evening, after sampling tracks across the massive Merzbow catalog. I’m not very familiar with the noise music genre, but it’s pretty antagonistic. Not really what I would call music, really, but something like difficult listening? Or kind of terrifying listening. It’s what evil alien robots would put on for entertainment. There are ghosts of melody, and of rhythm, but the tracks keep frustrating attempts to pick stable patterns out. It’s overwhelming, but after a while, I got into it.

The other parts aren’t so confrontational, they seem more akin to the work of a musician I really like: Mick Harris, particularly his Lull moniker. Well, I like Lull and some other isolationist stuff a lot. But that moves glacially and is minimalist. This, especially the first track of Achromatic, is like chaos itself through a few distortion pedals.

But, again, I got into it. It’s a little like reverse meditation. Your discomfort becomes focus, because it pushes everything else out of its path.

If this were your “thing,” if this was what you purport to listen to casually and regularly, I’d raise an eyebrow. I’d miss too much of what I enjoy music for—melody, rhythm, repetition.

Defying your expectations and assumption is a way to break out of stagnation of any kind. Exploring insanely different things than you know is good, even if it’s uncomfortable at first. Everything worth experiencing has a non-zero amount of effort to acquire it.

Good Art, Bad Art, It’s Hard to Tell the Difference If Your Definition Is Broad Enough

Good Art, Bad Art, It’s Hard to Tell the Difference If Your Definition Is Broad Enough

And I think it should be very broad, indeed. As in, not restricting it to things you admire or even like, beyond to what you find chaotic or obvious.

Because creativity is vast, and the things humans make are sometimes unexpected, and sometimes they look like a mess, framed.

But it’s hard to tell when someone is sincere and when they just have no idea what they’re doing. We praise a child’s exuberant stick figures, but disparage them when they come from an adult. Unless they’re funny! I’m that case, we can’t get enough of them (XKCD, Cyanide and Happiness).

Looking at Paul Klee’s work, there’s a childlike energy to it, and it’s still dismissed at a glance for being too simple or cartoonish. But there’s a deep symbolism within, sometimes invented, sometimes referenced to real world things. You can certainly dislike it, but it helps to look beyond the labels “good” and “bad.” Even in things you find gross or dumb, there’s often a lot of hard work that went into making it the way it is. Sometimes, even the fast sketches and drips contain years’ or decades’ worth of study and practice behind them.

It’s not that you can’t call a thing bad. Opinions are had by us all. But consider leaving it at the cursory or joke level, and always give a shit about looking deeper. It feeds and informs your work to be charitable and open to the stuff you encouter.

Slow and Steady Wins the Race, but Maybe Not *Too* Slow

Slow and Steady Wins the Race, but Maybe Not *Too* Slow

It feels like something needs to change. And that’s after everything changed for me. If there’s one thing moving is good for, it’s taking over every other concern in your life with its alarm bells and insistent stress.

It’s easy to separate professional and personal lives, and day job from artistic practice, but you really only have one life. It flows with time, always moving forward, not giving a damn about our attempts to compartmentalize and section it off. It’s useful to organize time that way, don’t get me wrong. But ultimately it all runs together and is affected by every other part of a life.

So, when you feel restless, that things have stagnated, that wheels are spinning in place, it’s good to remind yourself to slow down and just keep working. There’s just one downside: you can get lazy and stop altogether. Careful of that. It’s easy to put off the stuff you’re supposed to be doing.

The tortoise can be tempted by naps, too.

This Video Is Old, but Then, So’s the Mona Lisa and We Still Share That Thing

This Video Is Old, but Then, So’s the Mona Lisa and We Still Share That Thing

When I say “old,” I mean in contemporary art terms. 4 years on YouTube is decades of art history realtime. But I couldn’t stop watching this Sterling Ruby short, even when sharing it for someone else to check out. It’s visceral sculpture that gets to the heart of issues I’ve struggled with: what does gesture mean when the artist’s hand is subjugated to digitization, control, and technology that represents with ever greater range and expression? Why do physical work at all? Here’s one answer, and it’s mesmerizing to watch.

As a bonus, I didn’t come to the video first, I was amazed by this new article in Architectural Digest describing Ruby’s massive L.A. studio space, somewhere amid the industrial warehouses a few miles below downtown.

Let’s Have Another Quick Look at the Day Job, or, As Most of Us Call It, the Job

Let’s Have Another Quick Look at the Day Job, or, As Most of Us Call It, the Job

Look, after all, maybe your day is at night. I think to qualify, it has to be something you’d rather do less than the other thing you wish could support you. This is why I think a lot of us spend time putting it down, telling other people it’s not what we really do.

But I think this isn’t being kind. This isn’t fair to the job. If you imagine it’s a person with feelings, they’re going to be hurt. On the other hand, if we don’t get something happening with the thing-we’d-rather-be-doing soon, we’re going to be hurt. I’m trying out a different way of thinking about it.

Rather than resent my day job for taking me away from art, I’m trying to think of it as partner to creation. Maybe there’s an element of that in the job, but I’d say usually there isn’t much. But focus on those little aspects—as well as on the things that make it different from art—make it easier to go to work every day. My job isn’t my enemy, it’s my partner-in-crime, secretly enabling me to work on projects that I’m not ready to ask for money for.

If you find yourself hating your job, it could be time to hunt for a better one, but if you’re just wishing you could spend the time working on the creative stuff, maybe this framing can help. I’ll try to remember to post a follow-up in a while.

Little Obsessions and Indulging Them Should Be No Big Deal

Little Obsessions and Indulging Them Should Be No Big Deal

It seems like we get put down for carrying on a brief obsession with something, but it can be a reason to get familiar with something new or to experience something familiar with new eyes and ears.

My current is above, of course. The bass sound is gorgeously full, the slapback echo on the vocal is almost haunting, but still charming, and the melody and lyrics themselves are fun and earwormy. I hear something new almost ever re-listen, which is amazing. Now. How to apply this obsession to something I’m doing.

Sometimes the Way Out Is the Way In

Sometimes the Way Out Is the Way In

I took this photo for other purposes. But I’ve been staring at it, wondering if there’s a message to be extracted. Exit and entrance are the same opening. It’s the same size and appearance for both, nothing is different except which side you use.

Is art the same? Existence? Work, consumerism, relationships, comedy, water? I’m not sure. We can only interpret for ourselves and keep moving forward. If it means it’s time to turn around and go out the way we came, we’re still working on the journey, and still not giving up.

You Can Be on a Journey and Not Know Where You’re Going, and Your Work Is the Same

You Can Be on a Journey and Not Know Where You’re Going, and Your Work Is the Same

It’s something to think about. There’s a lot of advice and wisdom about starting long journeys, of a thousand miles or otherwise, but little about recognizing where you are if you don’t know.

But it’s okay. It really is more important to be journeying. If you keep traveling on, you’ll get somewhere, find maps and direction and purpose. And people.

Just Quickly, How Much Would You Sell Your Latest Piece/Thing/Joint for? How Little?

Just Quickly, How Much Would You Sell Your Latest Piece/Thing/Joint for? How Little?

We have dreams of making a lot of money with our work, most of us. Those are easy fantasies. Harder is to look in the opposite direction.

What your work is worth is, really, a balance between the most anyone would pay and the least. Which, let’s face it, is nothing, even assuming both ends of the scale are occupied by people who want your thing. But just as art is a gift to you, it’s also one you can decide to make.

Consider that, rather than lowball a piece or store it away, you could give it to someone—a person—who will value it as a precious gift, rather than squeezing the thing for pennies because you have a hard time getting the dollars.

Sometimes gifting is a choice of high value, not lowest possible profit.