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Category: Creation

Trifles Aren’t Worthless, They Can Lead to Big Ideas and Big Projects

Trifles Aren’t Worthless, They Can Lead to Big Ideas and Big Projects

The first thing you are asked to do in any drawing class for homework is to start a sketchbook. Sometimes there are specific things you’re asked to draw, but often the bulk of the pages are up to you as to what you fill them with.

Most working artists keep a sketchbook, too. It’s a repository for thoughts, lists, and…throwaway scraps of imagination and observation: ephemera. And they usually stay that way. The stuff we put in the sketchbook is just practice and things that occur to us in the moment, visually.

But having captured those fleeting shreds, every so often we’ll find a gem of an idea that’s actually a vein of possibility we can mine and turn into something big and meaningful. Keep an eye out, you never know where the scraps will reveal themselves to be more.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being Sick

The Unbearable Lightness of Being Sick

There are mostly disadvantages to getting ill. If you’re feeling particularly bad, there are scary (scarily expensive) doctor or hospital visits. But usually, it’s just a drawn out discomfort that leaves you disoriented and dazed.

There’s an advantage for artists: it can help you see in new ways and think new thoughts. They may not be coherent thoughts, but any chance to break out of patterns and routines of thinking is good. Try to write things down or sketch ideas. Usually, you’re too weak or uncoordinated to do real work, but getting the gist on paper (digital paper, too) can help you see different ways to make things when you feel better.

Searching for Words and Time, and a Sense of Purpose

Searching for Words and Time, and a Sense of Purpose

We do long to have meaning in our lives. We yank it from our stories, the fiction, film, and memoirs we consume. We pluck song lyrics and apply them to our existence like bumper stickers.

It’s not always important to know what you mean with your work. People who read and listen to and look at the things you do will find something that applies to them, more often than not. That’s a good thing, but it’s also what humans are good at.

But, if you, in your struggle to find what to say and how to say it every day, it will help you to have a meaningful framework beneath the thing you’re working on. It connects the deeper parts of you with the physical world. You’ll be putting more of you into your work and thus into the world.

Growth Happens When You Think You’re Standing Still (Not Quite, Though)

Growth Happens When You Think You’re Standing Still (Not Quite, Though)

That’s an old trope, made prominent by some New Age guru types. “It’s when you feel you aren’t making any progress that you’re growing the most!” It’s a good thing to tell yourself, especially when you’re feeling down about how slowly your work is going, or how terrible it all seems, right now. Conversely, it’s good to stay a bit humble about it when you think it’s brilliant (and I hope you do, sometimes!). An even temperament is the machine that drives a steady flow.

And there’s some truth to the trope, in my experience, but I’d say it’s more true that you don’t know how well your work is progressing in the time you make it. Look back on last year’s work and you can see good stuff and not-so-good.

But we are poor judges of today’s work, yesterday’s work, even last week’s work. It’s not important how you feel about what you just made. Remind yourself that future you gets to evaluate. Present you has one job: keep making it.

It Only Takes a Little Energy to Do a Little Bit of Your Thing

It Only Takes a Little Energy to Do a Little Bit of Your Thing

When you’re dead beat, there’s zero motivation to work on a project. It happens a lot after the day job for me. There’s not a lot you can do, but even a little effort can get you to the metaphorical—or actual—drawing board.

And that’s what you want. A page a day gets you a novel in a year. A line a day gets you several paintings, or a series, or a lot further along than you would be waiting for fresh energy, a full work day, or the lightning strike of inspiration.

A piece of something every day is you putting up a lightning rod.

Doing What You Know How to Do Is a Path to Sameness

Doing What You Know How to Do Is a Path to Sameness

What we want is to be different in some essential ways as we move our work along. We’re aiming to be better than we were yesterday, to change and to grow.

Actually, it’s best not to be specific about day-to-day progress or lack of it. There may be long periods where you feel like you’re getting nowhere, or even getting worse. But in the grand scheme, better than before.

But if you only ever do what you know how to do, you risk ruts and stagnation. It’s great to thoroughly explore mediums and idioms, but it’s in trying new things and new ways that we gather a storehouse of future possibility and potential.

Try new tools, new methods—your other hand if you’re not ambidextrous. Keep trying when you’re better, too. No dinosaurs. Art should be just as challenging and open as when you first started on your 100,000th piece.

Change Isn’t Good, Embracing Change Is

Change Isn’t Good, Embracing Change Is

On its own, change isn’t good or bad. It’s just inevitable. Time does, indeed, march on, and the bell tolls for thee. We don’t have a say in whether there will be change, in the world or in us.

But our choice is how to approach that existential reality. We can despair and give up—or become apathetic—but we can learn to value changes that are coming. There’s something different that’s going to happen. It means there is always something new to work with and incorporate.

Thinking About Minimalism as a Life Methodology Won’t Necessarily Carry Over to Art

Thinking About Minimalism as a Life Methodology Won’t Necessarily Carry Over to Art

The Minimalists aside—Donald Judd, Agnes Martin, Carl Andre—art is connecting the disconnected. It’s making associations from thought to thing.

We need to keep feeding our eyes and ears in order to make new things for the world. A clean, ordered room is a good thing, but art rises from chaos and unknowable juxtapositions.

Embrace the Fog of War

Embrace the Fog of War

In 4x and several top-down view games, in general, you can only see the area you’ve explored around you. It gets wider and more complete the more you move around, building and searching.

Art’s like that. You start with the barest notion of what you’re going to end up with. You’re creating a new world with a new map, and it can be a little scary and not a little confusing.

But just as we trust in the game designers to allow few if any dead ends and disconnected areas, we trust our selves to uncover the patterns and the countryside of the piece we’re working on.

We discover the map in the process of creating, and if we open up to the discovery, it’s an exciting journey. An exciting game.