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Category: Musings

The Time Dilation Effect on a Rainy Day

The Time Dilation Effect on a Rainy Day

Today was a strange day. It seemed to stretch on for hours longer than it’s allotted time, when no matter what I did, there was still more time before work.

But it was nice, and reminded me of the sensation you get when you lose yourself in the flow of art making. Time just seems to open up and you lose yourself in the work. More of those days, please.

Rediscovering Discoveries I Thought I Wasn’t Into Subverts My Assumptions

Rediscovering Discoveries I Thought I Wasn’t Into Subverts My Assumptions

Assumptions about what I like can quickly become dogma, and it’s especially strong where music is concerned. Like any other preference in art, it’s good to push against your biases and preconceptions, even when you’re the one who made them.

Parquet Courts is a recent example. I like them, but wasn’t as blown away by their last album as a lot of people in my musical sphere of influence. And yet, somehow, this one song played while I was out today, and I didn’t remember they’d done it. It was terrific, different than most of the other songs, and made me want to listen more closely to the whole album.

There. Opinion diverted, openness to explore renewed. I hope I can keep that mindset going in the future.

“Wide Awake” on Spotify

The Secret Is, It’s All About X

The Secret Is, It’s All About X

But seriously, though, it’s never just about one thing. Your quest to be genuine, authentic, sincere. Your drive to be great at your thing. Your desire to connect with people.

Life and business and creativity all have multiple paths and more than one reason things go either wrong or right.

A Little Push Against Your Comfort Zone Is Good, and Helps Any Expansive Goal

A Little Push Against Your Comfort Zone Is Good, and Helps Any Expansive Goal

If you want to get better at a thing—your thing, let’s say—you have to get out of any routine where you’re comfortable. It has to hurt a little, be annoying, a bit hard. The muscle metaphor is spread around a lot regarding this principle, by any number of experts in motivation or self-improvement: no pain, no gain.

But I’m not talking about being so sore you can hardly move. I just mean a small amount of discomfort. See, I don’t think you have to push your limits all the time. Steady progress can be had with the smallest nudge against your present abilities.

What matters is that you notice. That you recognize breaking out of easy routine, or you look ahead to where you’d like to be with your thing, your work. It can be discouraging to hurt a lot, even if you know the gains will come faster. I’m for whatever keeps moving you forward, and outside of the gym, it’s perfectly fine to go slow and get better in very small steps.

It’s still getting better.

What Was Broken Is Now Repaired, for Now

What Was Broken Is Now Repaired, for Now

The only thing you can count on about the internet is the weird superimposition of the robustness and fragility of data. Sometimes your database gets corrupted and you lose posts. Sometimes there are backups to restore. It’s both. That’s weird.

Taking a Sick Day, but Nah

Taking a Sick Day, but Nah

When I was little, a sick day meant I stayed in bed and slept as much as possible. It seemed like it was all or nothing, either incapacitated and miserable or some sniffles. I’m still incapacitated now and then, but most days I’m sick I can still work or do things around the apartment. Just more slowly and painfully.

It’s worth working on your thing, whatever it is, and if that involves a studio across town, maybe it’s sketch time or a writing session. Getting something created, something made, feeds into the deep satisfaction and fulfillment we’re cultivating. It’s not medicine, but it will help you feel better.

Meet the New Resolutions, Same as the Old Resolutions

Meet the New Resolutions, Same as the Old Resolutions

    1. Read more books, rather than online feeds and articles (shifting from scanning to close reading)
    1. Spend time in active listening to music (I used to do this when a favorite band released a new album: just listening to the tracks and doing nothing else the first time through)
    2. Get back into an education routine (regular scheduled class time made school the easiest investment in learning)

    Progress is ongoing, let’s see how it shakes out in 360 days!

    Miss and a Swing, the New Year Gets Busy

    Miss and a Swing, the New Year Gets Busy

    Rather, I got busy, with a changing schedule that finally caught up with me post-holidays. So I missed a daily post yesterday after a rare night shift. But that’s as may be. Life isn’t a factory where you set up processes and systems and they run on a timetable. Bits of it, maybe, but not everything.

    Your art is the same. You’ve got goals, ideals, and maybe you’ve made resolutions to create more stuff in the new year. And—maybe—you’ve stumbled or missed. It’s okay. This is a year to be kinder to yourself about your work.

    One of my goals in 2019 is to gently encourage, rather than berate, myself about mistakes and dropping various balls. Positive reinforcement is a hedge against so much toxicity and anger out there beyond your skin. C’mon. It’s time to be your own kindest critic, at least for a while.

    Life Moves in Seasons, but Orbits Are Continuous

    Life Moves in Seasons, but Orbits Are Continuous

    In the immediate human world, we can see the passage of time in seasonal change, at least, beyond the equator. We remember the past winter, we chop up time into moon phases and days. It’s easy to be hard on yourself for not being where you want when the new winter supplants the old.

    But in a grander sense, there is no specific division of time. The illusion of time as a discrete thing is easy when it’s light and dark, cold and hot. Step out a million miles, and we’re all falling around the sun in a smooth curve, any moment like any other.

    You could say there’s no starting point, or you could say every moment is a potential start.

    So leverage the excitement of New Year’s to get started on new howls, or reinvigorate old ones. But don’t forget you always have a chance to start again, from wherever you are along the curve.

    Keep Taking Time to Check In With Yourself

    Keep Taking Time to Check In With Yourself

    We need time to think. Time to ponder and choose directions. It’s easy to put on earbuds and get lost in sound, or binge a few series in our off time from work.

    But you’ll benefit for knowing where you want to go next, both in life and your work. And you can’t hear your own thoughts about that if you don’t just sit with them, alone. I used to do this on drives, my commute was 30–45 minutes. Now that it’s 15 minutes at most, often shorter on the bus, I do it while walking. Doesn’t have to be a big thing, but it’s good to have a direction and finalized decision-making.