The Recursion of Second Guessing When You Hesitate

The Recursion of Second Guessing When You Hesitate

Not all instances—and certainly not in art—lend themselves to quick decisions, but most often, forging ahead with decisions and paths is the best.

Hesitation and too much thinking about choices and potential outcomes can easily spiral inward in a disappointing and never-ending lack of finishing. Gut feeling doesn’t always work, but it does get you started.

The Building Across the Street As Sketch Subject

The Building Across the Street As Sketch Subject

It was asking for it. I think my point was going to be that the thing(s) right in front of you are fine subjects to draw. It’s not enough to learn it once, you have to keep at it. As in, daily or near-daily practice.

It’s not much like riding a bike, honestly. It’s like going to the gym. And, unfortunately for my ego, I think my drawing muscles are pretty atrophied. Back to the gym.

Revel in the Epitome of Extroversion That Is Tom Wilson

Revel in the Epitome of Extroversion That Is Tom Wilson

I’ve always admiredTom Wilson’s bravura performance in the Back to the Future trilogy, he made a lot with his part and created a very real Biff out of a basic cartoonish part.

But here Tom—opposite Christopher Lloyd—seems to feed off the presence of the crowd, generously giving his seemingly boundless energy to an appreciative audience.

This sort of presence is something of a mystery to me as a confirmed introvert. I have to fake being calm and into the thing discussed. If I could be this guy when doing art-related speaking or activities, I’d try to do it more often.

Photo Stream of Every Floor’s Glass Tile Mural in My Building

Photo Stream of Every Floor’s Glass Tile Mural in My Building

Opposite the elevators in my apartment building on every floor is a glass tile mural. The colors and pattern are different on every floor. I’ve been wanting to check out the differences, and today I decided to take a photo of all of them, so I walked floor-to-floor by the stairs as a kind of micro-pilgrimage.

It’s thrilling to see such a variety of colors and sequencing, and I wish I knew who designed/installed them because a lot of care and thought clearly went into the choices.

This sort of public art is an endearing kind. Something meant for just those who live next to it, but available to curious others and visitors. It’s abstract contemporary stuff, sure, but it’s also got some of the cultural connection most murals have.

Macca Making the Most of His Moods Means Much to Me

Macca Making the Most of His Moods Means Much to Me

Paul McCartney’s slightly vertigo-inducing video for “I Don’t Know” is one of my favorite tracks on his new album, Egypt Station. It’s not a great album, and could have used some trimming, I think, but there are gems, and this is one. Paul often gets dismissed for, well, silly love songs—specifically by John Lennon, there—but mostly by those who consider he’s forever cranking out sunny fluff. But he’s got a darker side, his share of gloom, and those songs are found throughout his oeuvre.

It seems a piece with some of his later work where he addresses being older, having a sense of his own mortality. Self-examination is important for all of us, especially those of us making things. We put our hearts into the work, and without knowing the dark side as well as the light, we aren’t approaching it with our complete selves.

The Things That Fulfill Us as Human Beings and Remembering What’s Important

The Things That Fulfill Us as Human Beings and Remembering What’s Important

I spent quite a few hours just talking with some friends old and new this evening. I’m battling a cold, and really not feeling 100%, physically or mentally.

But the chance to latch onto contact with others is valuable, and I feel it’s lacking and overlooked by many of us as we go about lives that are overwhelmed with agendas and obligations.

On paper, just stated as a concept, it’s trivial: a few people getting together to chat. But the connections we make and maintain are vital to all other aspects of existing.

You can’t create your best work in complete isolation. Art feeds off the everyday and ordinary, because that’s how it connects. The most unusual and mysterious pieces need a human connection in order to resonate and compel.

Stuck on ‘Making Of’ and ‘Behind the Scenes’ Videos the Last Four Days

Stuck on ‘Making Of’ and ‘Behind the Scenes’ Videos the Last Four Days

It’s kind of a video version of comfort food. ST:TNG and Back to the Future have been mainstays. It’s strangely soothing to hear people talk about their respective franchises from both inside and outside.

I am exhausted, and this stuff is helping me cope while I settle into a new city attempting to tie up loose ends in the old.

Art 21 Is Back, and Here’s a Susan Philipsz Clip

Art 21 Is Back, and Here’s a Susan Philipsz Clip

Art 21 has often been marvelous, showcasing contemporary art of many styles and media. I’m excited to see it’s coming back around again.

 Philipsz works in a kind of nebulous conceptual framework, but centered on sound and how it evokes memory and emotion in the listener. I use nebulous because I think we have difficulty categorizing and describing art that isn’t some object on a wall. This is good to think about.

On Being Where You Want to Be, Especially If You’re Not Where You Don’t Want to Be

On Being Where You Want to Be, Especially If You’re Not Where You Don’t Want to Be

Lots of us have an idea of a perfect place to live, and getting that place is a major life goal, at least at certain times. I’m going to come out with it here: I thought I should be in the Pacific Northwest right now, and though I’m not sure there’s such a thing as perfect, I’m here, and it’s magical.

But even more so, I think, because I’m no longer in a place I was tired of, weary, even. My cynicism and charitableness toward the place I was had grown paper thin, and I think you need a good measure of those things to sustain you through the tough moments when your ideals aren’t met and the place slaps you across the face like a city-sized Joan Collins.

This is why I think there aren’t “perfect” places to live. Every place has advantages and drawbacks. You give the advantages your enthusiasm and give the drawbacks your charity.

Because it isn’t anyone’s fault that the place you live doesn’t always thrill and sustain you. At least, not usually. And I recognize it’s a privilege to be able to pick up and move a thousand or more miles away. I’m grateful I have that.

But I am enjoying the change, which is necessary and beneficial in and if its own right.