The Right Wrongs

I was reading some things about a sort of contemporary prescriptive thinker, who’s become a guru, in a way, for people who want to see the world as needing more structure and rules of tradition. I won’t link there, no. It’s not for me to say it’s objectively wrong, or bad, either. But it’s not the way I think I want to live, nor the way I want to help shape the world—at least my corner of it. I like the descriptive approach to society, and even to life.

I was thinking myself that making art is better served in a similar way by being always open to new or individual methods of discovery and structure. We need to overturn, question, eschew traditional ways of creation. We need, desperately, to avoid perfection.

In order to make something good, something different and true and compelling, I need to give myself the space to mess up. And then I need to mess up.

I have to flub. I need to blow it. I’ve got to fail, to crash and burn, to slip up, to be wrong, to ruin, to miss the mark,

I need to fuck up.

That’s the way you find not only new ways of making stuff, but totally new types of it, things no one has seen before, strange work that builds on the art of the past but at the same time is new.

Our mistakes lead to change and new paths. Not our perfected customs.

Out There

Carl Sagan was a seminal influence on my childhood. Well, teenhood. Cosmos (the original) still holds up as a joyful immersion in the mysteries of life and journey into space.

The need for contemplation and wonder is vital to art creation. Our curiosity to explore encompasses our need to create, the two are linked. And indulging exploration of any kind informs the work.

Keep searching, feeding curiosity, cultivating wonder.

Modular Synthesis

I watched a documentary about the rise, fall, and rebirth of analog modular synthesizer technology called I Dream of Wires.

I was amused to think that modular synthesis is what many artists do as part of their work. We take bits of ideas and parts of a whole and put them together in new ways, moving plugs and dialing certain elements up and down.

We make and remix concepts and create new things in the world.

Traditions

How very human it is to desire rituals. They’ve been part of who we are as long as history, and almost certainly from the dawn of us becoming human in the first place.

We’d love to be iconoclasts, smashing the stuffy conventions and customs of the past. But it might be detrimental to be too enamored of the new. We still find truth and connection in our traditions, and that desire for them may well fill a biological need.

There is such a thing as going too far, creatively, if we lose a work being relatable.

Reaching Out

A woman I didn’t know hugged me at work the other day. She had mentioned the card scanner always says, “approved,” at the end of a transaction, and said she liked how it validated her. This devolved into some jokes about how we rely on machines so much now, downplaying the need for validation.

I said, “We all need approval now and then, especially during the holiday season.” She immediately moved around the counter and opened her arms to hug me. I gratefully met her embrace.

When we separated, she said, “aw, you guys are gonna make me cry.”

We can’t forget our need for human contact. We need each other sometimes, the introverted and the extro-.

Remember we usually make things for other people. We aren’t sending objects into the void, we need reactions, responses, takes.

We need to connect. We don’t have be wary of that need.